architecture : urban : visual culture

Water in the Desert

Sharjah Institute of Research, Technology & Innovation – under development in the United Arab Emirates next to the Aljada quarter development – was in need of in innovative solution that is both an education centre for the university campus in matters of water treatment and recovery, as well as a compact in high tech closed water treatment facility for the development site.

 

The 8000 m2 facility serves as an educational facility, and the water treatment centre for the campus. phase 1 of the site comprises of the first water treatment greenhouse, and the educational facilities. The architecture of the building is an “educational landscape”, where the main educational spaces are laid out horizontally, with jump of one level to make space for the engineering rooms.


Sharjah Research, Technology & Innovation Park - Water Education Centre, Architect: Németh Roland, 2019

 

The U-shaped arrangement creates a patio – part of the traditional architecture of the area – and an entrance space which leads to the gardens in the back of the main building, separating it from the later water treatment phases.


Sharjah Research, Technology & Innovation Park - Water Education Centre, Architect: Németh Roland, 2019


Sharjah Research, Technology & Innovation Park - Water Education Centre, Architect: Németh Roland, 2019

 


The defining feature of the main building is the flowing roof covering the educational landscape. It is following the required height of the spaces below, and provides shading from the high sun. The structure of the roof is derived from geometric motives of the regional architecture.

 

Sharjah Research, Technology & Innovation Park - Water Education Centre, Architect: Németh Roland, 2019


Sharjah Research, Technology & Innovation Park - Water Education Centre, Architect: Németh Roland, 2019


Sharjah Research, Technology & Innovation Park - Water Education Centre, Architect: Németh Roland, 2019.

 

To emphasize the sustainable function of the building, two windcatcher towers help with the cooling of the interior spaces. These towers are a traditional architectural element, and funnel the higher winds down into the building, while also utilizing an evaporative heat exchanger, which uses the clean water produced in the facility. This provides an example for the students of how to combine water treatment high technology with climate adaptive local architecture.

 

Németh Roland

 

 

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