architecture : urban : visual culture

Liberty Bridge – New horizons in the city

The central element of the exhibition is the temporary architectural installation in the atrium: a lookout tower that allows visitors to access the building in a never-before-seen way. The Hungarian Pavilion [designed by Studio Nomad] at this year's Venice Biennale represents how our relationship to the public spaces transformed since the political changes. 

16th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia – Hungarian Pavilion

 

The exhibition

In addition to the deeper understanding of the events presented, the exhibition offers the opportunity to live through the independent space occupation, the “Liberty Bridge experience”. The installation interferes minimally with the building's structure, but its use will be completely redefined.

The central element of the exhibition is the temporary architectural installation in the atrium: a lookout tower that allows visitors to access the building in a never-before-seen way. In the first room, a video installation of archive footage shows what kind of process led to the occupation of Liberty Bridge in 2016. Through the three milestones of the bridge's recent history, the temporal interpretation of the events expands and we can examine how our relationship to public space has transformed since the political changes.
In the second room, architects and city dwellers share their personal experiences in short, one-minute film etudes. The yoga mat installation set up in the space does not just bring back doing yoga together on the bridge, but by pointing to yoga philosophy, it refers to the inseparable interlacement of inner and outer freedom.

Close to the stairs of the lookout tower, in the apse, we can monitor the Instagram presence of Liberty Bridge, linking us directly to the bridge, and at the same time refer to the outstanding role of social media in self-organization. The material usage of the exhibition is uniform, and the grating surface of the upper arc of the lookout, often used in public spaces, appears in the exhibition halls, too. The light effects of the metal grid structure elements thus formed reflect the mirror effect of the water surface.


Hungarian Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2018 - architect: Studio Nomad - photo: Balázs Danyi

Hungarian Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2018 - architect: Studio Nomad - photo: Balázs Danyi




The lookout

The lookout tower built in the atrium of the building allows us to experience the events of Liberty Bridge. The 10-meter-high installation is embedded in the space, leading the visitors above the building, giving a completely new perspective to the Giardini's garden and surrounding national pavilions from among the treetops.

The structure is simple metal scaffolding that connects to the building only on the ground floor. Its appearance and design suggest temporaryity, referring to the occasional transformation of the bridge into a public square.
The architecture of the upper level of the lookout tower is similar to the central supporting structure of Liberty Bridge. Visitors can relax, enjoy the view, assess their position, and see a new horizon on the slightly curved surface.

The lookout creates an unprecedented situation in the pavilion's original spatial system. Its presence is natural with its casual appearance; its use is self-evident to visitors. The installation makes it possible to experience the feeling what the free use of public space means for people living in the city.


Hungarian Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2018 - architect: Studio Nomad - photo: Balázs Danyi

Hungarian Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2018 - architect: Studio Nomad - photo: Balázs Danyi


 

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